Intern Kelly

A Beginner's Guide to Finding a Job: Interview Tips

Hue & Tone Creative - A Beginner's Guide to Finding a Job

If you read our Beginner's Guide to Finding a Job series this summer, you may be wondering what happened to Intern Kelly.

Kelly's tips and tricks for the job search worked well -- so well that she found and accepted her first post-grad job! We're sharing the final post in Kelly's series here today.

It covers all aspects of the interview preparation process. And if there's one aspect of pre-freelance life I remember most vividly, it's job interviews. 

They can be completely nervewracking...but I've learned that being completely, carefully prepared is the best possible way to stave off nerves. There's no such thing as being too prepared for an interview. 

Kelly's tips, which cover everything from initial prep to follow-up, are below. 

Whether you have a phone, Skype, or face-to-face interview, being confident and prepared is crucial. In most cases, phone interviews are the first step in landing a face-to-face interview—so it’s important to nail it! Here are a few ways to make sure the interview process goes smoothly: 

1. Prepare.

Know your stuff. Research the company before the interview so that you're comfortable discussing the services, culture, and expectations of the company. During my own job search, these questions were often asked right out of the gate -- usually during phone interviews. 

2. Ask questions.

Make sure to ask questions during the interview process.  Asking questions demonstrates your genuine interest in the potential position and your engagement with the process, and shows the interviewer you're eager to learn more. A few of my favorite questions to ask are: 

What are the biggest challenges the person in this position will face?

What would a successful first year in the position look like?

What are the qualities someone in this position need to succeed?

3. Show off your previous work.

For phone or Skype interviews, attach a link to your online portfolio when you confirm the interview time, or when you send your resume.  Print out samples for in person interviews – it’s always better to be overly prepared, and having printed samples can help guide the conversation if you find yourself forgetting your accomplishments.

4. Look the part.

Interviewers will take in how you look before you even start talking – and Skype interviews are no exception! It is important to look your best. While the attire that's considered professional varies depending on the industry, for men it generally involves wearing a tailored suit, with nice shoes.  A dark colored suit will also do the trick for women, with a short close-toed heel. When in doubt, wear business professional dress, pay attention to what others in your industry are wearing, and keep makeup and jewelry to a minimum.  

5. Follow up.

Chances are you won’t be the only one interviewing for a position – don’t let the interviewer forget about you! Immediately after your interview, jot down notes in the car about your conversation. Nothing is too insignificant – write down everything from position specifics and project details to the names of your interviewer's children. While these smaller details may not be useful in the short-term, you’ll be glad you have them if you go back for a second interview or end up getting the position. Add your interviewer on LinkedIn and follow-up with a well-thought-out email.

Thanks for following along with this series! If you're an interviewing pro, I'd love to know your tips. What calms your pre-interview jitters? What's your answer for "what's your biggest weakness"? Let me know in the comments below. 

A Beginner's Guide to Finding a Job: Tips for a Successful Job Search

Hi everyone! Kelly Roberts here -- aka Intern Kelly -- I am a recent graduate of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and am currently looking for my first "real" job. Through my internship at Hue & Tone I am learning tips and tricks for becoming a more competitive job applicant. Over the next few weeks I'll be updating you on my progress through the blog, so feel free to follow along! 


Job Searching -- Hue & Tone Creative

Now that you have your resume perfected and your personal brand established, it’s time to begin the job search! One of the most important things to remember is to be patient – there are so many steps between finding an appealing job and actually getting an offer.

·      Start with job sites like Indeed, Monster, Glassdoor and Simply Hired. These job engines are a great place to start your search – you can search by title and location to start to get a feel for what’s available in your area.

·      Branch out from job search sites. Know who the big players are in your industry or area? Head to their websites and check out the job openings there. Some companies don’t utilize tools like Indeed, or they may offer more information about a position on their own websites – don’t risk missing out on an opportunity!

·      Don’t confine yourself to just searching on the Internet. Ask friends and family to keep an ear out for you – you never know who they know that might be hiring. Plus, using a family connection may help you get an interview.

TIP: Keep a log/running list of businesses and positions that you are applying for so that if a recruiter calls you out of the blue, you can refer to your list to see which job they are referring to. Keep in mind that phone interviews can happen at any time and are usually the first step in the interview process—be prepared!

·      Keep your applications narrow. It is VERY easy to get carried away when applying for jobs, especially when sites like Indeed allow you to apply with a preloaded resume.  Don’t waste your time applying for jobs that are far outside of your range of experience or aren’t in a feasible location.

·      Use Glassdoor to get an idea of expected salary. Once you’ve found a few positions you’re interested in, use Glassdoor to get an idea of the typical salary for that position. You don’t want to waste your time applying for a job that is paying dramatically below market rate. Some applications even ask you for expected salary – if you’re required to give an answer, use Glassdoor to guide you.

·      Be realistic. As a recent graduate you’re most likely going to only qualify for entry-level positions. It might not be as glamorous as you imagined or pay what you want, but it’s the first step in your career and should be treated as a learning experience. If you’ve been searching for months, don’t miss out on a good opportunity because you’re holding out for the perfect job.

And remember -- whatever you do, don't get discouraged! 

A Beginner's Guide to Finding a Job (Part 2): Resumes

Hi everyone! Kelly Roberts here -- aka Intern Kelly -- I am a recent graduate of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and am currently looking for my first "real" job. Through my internship at Hue & Tone I am learning tips and tricks for becoming a more competitive job applicant. Over the next few weeks I'll be updating you on my progress through the blog, so feel free to follow along! 


No matter who you talk to — professors, classmates, or business professionals — everyone has a different opinion on the “correct” way to construct your resume.  One of the most important things to keep in mind is that your resume should be tailored to fit your industry.  Below are a few classic tips that you should ALWAYS keep in mind when writing and editing your resume.  Enjoy!  

Resume Tips & Tricks -- Hue & Tone Creative

A Beginner's Guide to Finding a Job (Part 1): Brand Yourself

Hi everyone! Kelly Roberts here -- aka Intern Kelly -- I am a recent graduate of The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and am currently looking for my first "real" job. Through my internship at Hue & Tone I am learning tips and tricks for becoming a more competitive job applicant. Over the next few weeks I'll be updating you on my progress through the blog, so feel free to follow along! 

Intern Kelly -- Hue & Tone Creative
Finding a Job, Part One: Brand Yourself -- Hue & Tone Creative

1.   Reflect on who you are and what you have to offer.
This calls for self-reflection time. This can be very challenging, because there can be many different things that make you, you. It is important to establish the things that you enjoy, and are good at. Not just professionally, but personally as well. What are your best skills? Honesty is key, stay true to yourself – and when in doubt, ask those around you what stands out to them.  

2.   Build a personal website.
Build a site filled with blog entries, a record of your professional endeavors, and work samples. I cannot express the importance of this enough! Especially in the creative industry, it is important to have a portfolio of your work – and an Internet portfolio is the way to go. This gives potential employers the opportunity to get a feel for who you are before bringing you in for a face-to-face interview. It is one thing to tell potential employers about your successful work, but it is another to actually show them.

3.    Clean up your social media accounts.
Make sure you’re projecting a professional persona online. By changing your privacy settings on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook you can control who can view your posts, pictures, and thoughts. You want to make sure that the way you are presenting yourself on social media is a good reflection of you as a professional. Most importantly, don’t forget to keep your experience up to date on your LinkedIn.

4.   Understand the expectations of your industry.
Each professional industry has its own rules, which your personal brand should follow. Do plenty of research to find out who the major players in your industry are, how much color you should use on your resume, and what kind of salary you should expect. Don’t hesitate to reach out to a favorite professor as you explore your field – they’re there to help. As you build your brand, broadcast a physical appearance that balances your personal style and the expectations associated with the industry or career you plan to pursue.

5.   Use social media to market your new online brand.
Once you have established your brand, you own the right to flaunt it! Use social media to your advantage – post Facebook statuses and tweets letting your followers know that you are in the job market. Brag about your specialties and abilities, and pay the extra money to update your LinkedIn profile! 

6.   Network in-person.
Technology is awesome for making and keeping connections; however, it does not replace face-to-face time. Facial expressions, tone of voice, and body language are just a few of the things that make a huge difference in a conversation. Relationships typically grow stronger when you interact with someone in-person, it’s often easier to relate to them and it shows you're invested in getting to know them as well.

Stay tuned for next week's blog post on how to make your resume stand out from the crowd. Have a question in the meantime? Email me at kerober2@gmail.com